Pages

Thursday, 17 January 2019

Sheena, Queen of the Jungle, (#01 - #18) 1942 - 1952-53 Complete Series [Fiction House Comics Collection 08]


 1942 Series
Published in English (United States)  United States
Publication Dates:
Spring 1942 - Winter 1952-53
Number of Issues Published:
18 (#01 - #18)
Color:   color
Dimensions:   standard Golden Age US
Paper Stock:   glossy cover; newsprint interior
Binding:  saddle-stitched
Pages: 68       -          Indicia: frequency Quarterly
Notes
Original index for this series was created from the indexing work of Henry Steele.


Sheena, Queen of the Jungle made her appearance in a British magazine titled Wags in 1937. She was the creation of Will Eisner and S.M. 'Jerry' Iger and their company Eisner & Iger. To hide the fact that their studio comprised of just the two of them, the strip was signed under the pseudonym of 'W. Morgan Thomas'.

It has been quoted that Eisner said one of the inspirations for Sheena was H. Rider Haggard's jungle-goddess novel 'She'.

In September 1938 Sheena made her appearance in the United States, in issue #1 of Fiction House's Jumbo Comics. In Spring 1942 the comic book Sheena, Queen of the Jungle appeared making her the first female character with her own title. This lasted a total of 18 issues finishing in Winter 1952.

Since that time Sheena has made fleeting appearances in comic books and other media, including a 26-episode TV series, first aired in 1955-56 with Irish McCalla playing the title role. In 1984 Columbia Pictures released Sheena, starring Tanya Roberts and in 2000 Sheena was played by Gena Lee Nolin in a 35 episode TV series.

From http://furycomics.com


Authors: 

Script
?
Pencils
Robert Webb, Dan Zolnerowich, Robert Webb, Art Saaf
Dan Zolnerowich, Alex Blum
Inks
Robert Webb,  Dan Zolnerowich, Robert Webb, Mort Leav
Dan Zolnerowich, Alex Blum
Colors
?
Letters
?





Links: Sheena, Queen of the Jungle, (#01 - #18) ⇲⇲

Tuesday, 15 January 2019

Jumbo Comics (#001 - #167) 1938 - 1953 Complete Series [Fiction House Comics Collection 07]
























1938 Series
Published in English (United States)  United States
Publication Dates:    September 1938 - March 1953
Number of Issues Published:   167 (#001 - #167)
Color:
Black and White (#1-8); Color (#9 onwards)
Dimensions:
Tabloid:10.5 x 14 1/2 (#1-8); 8.5 x 10.5 inches (#9); Standard Golden Age U.S. (#10 onwards)
Paper Stock:  Newsprint
Binding:  Saddle-Stitched
Publishing Format:  Was ongoing series
Publication Type:   magazine
 Pages 68         Indicia frequency Monthly

Notes
Original index for this series was created from the indexing work of Henry Steele.

According to Peter Hansen as quoted by Ken Quattro at http://thecomicsdetective.blogspot.com/2010/04/return-to-wonderful-wags-...
the early issues of this comic were direct reprints of the U.K. (and Australian) publication Wags, to which Eisner and Iger had supplied material and bought the printing plates. This is the reason for the unusual (by American standards) size of the early issues.



During the 1920's and 1930's Fiction House produced pulp magazines under imprints such as Real Adventures Publishing Co and Glen-Kel. Late in 1930's Fiction House's owner, Thurman T. Scott, decided to move the company into comic books. The comic market was on the way up and sales of pulp magazines were declining.

In association with Eisner & Iger who were 'packagers', producing comic books on demand issue, #1 of Jumbo Comics was published in September 1938. This would prove, to be at least in the short term, a shrewd business move by Thurman Scott.

In the first issue and making her American debut was 'Sheena, Queen of the Jungle' a character that Will Eisner and S.M. 'Jerry' Iger had previously created for a British magazine titled Wags. The leggy and scantily clad Sheena would became a mainstay of the company's stable. She also would set the tone of many of the subsequent titles which would feature 'Good Girl Art'.

With Jumbo's popularity Fiction House would then publish such titles as: Jungle Comics, Wings Comics, Firehair and Eisner's The Spirit. It would now be a major comic book producer for the next 15 years.

From http://furycomics.com




Authors:

Script
Bob Kane, S. M. Iger, Donald DeConn, Will Eisner, Audrey Blum, 
Dick Briefer,Tom Alexander, Lee Harris

Pencils, 
Bob Kane, S. M. Iger, Donald DeConn, Jack Kirby, Will Eisner, Mort Meskin, 
Bernard Baily, Rafael Astarita, Nina Albright, 
Lee Harris, Robert Webb,  Alex Blum, Dick Briefer,

Inks
Bob Kane, S. M. Iger, Donald DeConn, Jack Kirby, Will Eisner, Mort Meskin, 
Bernard Baily, Rafael Astarita, Nina Albright
Lee Harris, Ann Brewster, Dick Briefer

Colors
?
Letters
Jack Kirby 










Sheena, Queen of the Jungle




Sheena, Queen of the Jungle is a fictional American comic book jungle girl heroine, originally published primarily by Fiction House. She was the first female comic book character with her own title, with her 1937 (in Great Britain; 1938 in the United States) premiere preceding Wonder Woman #1 (cover-dated Dec. 1941). Sheena inspired a wealth of similar comic book jungle queens. She was predated in literature by Rima, the Jungle Girl, introduced in the 1904 William Henry Hudson novel Green Mansions.

An orphan who grew up in the jungle, learning how to survive and thrive there, she possesses the ability to communicate with wild animals and is proficient in fighting with knives, spears, bows, and makeshift weapons. Her adventures mostly involve encounters with slave traders, white hunters, native Africans, and wild animals.

Fiction House

Sheena debuted in Joshua B. Power's British magazine Wags #1 in January 1937.She was created by S. M. "Jerry" Iger who ran his own small studio, "Universal Phoenix Features" (UFP), and who commissioned Mort Meskin to produce prototype drawings of Sheena. UFP was one of a handful of studios that produced comics on demand for publishers and syndicates, and whose client Editors Press Service distributed the feature to Wags. Saying he could no longer afford to pay Will Eisner as a freelancer, he co-founded Eisner & Iger, which continued the work of UFP, but Iger bought out Eisner when (according to Iger) Eisner went to produce propaganda for the US Army but other sources say Eisner left so he could create The Spirit. To help hide the fact their studio consisted only of themselves, the duo signed their Sheena strip with the pseudonym "W. Morgan Thomas". Eisner said an inspiration for the character's name was H. Rider Haggard's 1886 jungle-goddess novel She.

Sheena first appeared stateside in Fiction House's Jumbo Comics #1, and subsequently in every issue (Sept. 1938 – April 1953), as well as in her groundbreaking 18-issue spin-off, Sheena, Queen of the Jungle (Spring 1942 – Winter 1952), the first comic book to title-star a female character.Sheena also appeared in Fiction House's Ka'a'nga #16 (Summer 1952) and the one-shot 3-D Sheena, Jungle Queen (1953)—the latter reprinted by Eclipse Comics as Sheena 3-D (January 1985) and by Blackthorne Publishing as Sheena 3-D Special (May 1985). Blackthorne also published Jerry Iger's Classic Sheena (April 1985).


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


LINKS: Jumbo Comics (#001 - #167)⇲⇲

Sunday, 13 January 2019

Kaänga Comics (#1-#20) 1949 - 1954 [Fiction House Comics Collection 06]


 1949 Series
Published in English (United States) United States

Publication Dates:
    Spring 1949 - Summer 1954 
Number of Issues Published:
    20 (#1 - #20) 
Color:  Color 
Dimensions: Standard Golden Age U. S. 
Paper Stock:  glossy cover; newsprint interior 
Binding    saddle-stitched 
Publishing Format:   was ongoing series 
Publication Type:    magazine 


Notes
Original index for this series was created from the indexing work of Henry Steele.
Comic title is Kaänga Comics for #1-4, then Kaänga Jungle King (or Kaänga, Jungle King)
The title is often confused as being "Ka'a'nga Comics" because of the placement of the accent markings.

Pages 52          Indicia: ?

Authors:

Script
Sidney Elias,

Pencils
Tom Cataldo ?; Ruben Moreira, John Celardo, Jack Kamen, Iger Shop,
George Tuska, John Celardo, Matt Baker, Charles Sultan, Enrico Bagnoli
Maurice Whitman

Inks
Maurice Whitman,  Ruben Moreira, John Celardo, Jack Kamen, Iger Shop,
George Tuska, John Celardo, Tony D'Adamo, Ray Osrin,
Charles Sultan, Enrico Bagnoli

Colors
?

Letters
?









Links: Kaänga Comics (#1-#20)⇲⇲

Friday, 11 January 2019

Four Color Dell, 1942-1962 [#0051-#0100]



Four Color
Dell, 1942 Series
Published in English (United States) United States

Publication Dates:
    1942 - April-June 1962 
Number of Issues Published:
    1331 (#1 - Little Joe - #1354 - Calvin and the Colonel) 
Color:  Color 
Dimensions:
    Standard Golden Age U.S.; Standard Silver Age U.S. 
Paper Stock:    Glossy Cover; Newsprint Interior 
Binding:    Saddle-stitched 
Publishing Format:   Was Ongoing Series 
Publication Type:   magazine 
Pages  68  Indicia frequency  ?

More information HERE


Four Color  Dell,  [#0051-#0100]  1944-1946

TITLES:

Four Color 0051 Bugs Bunny
Four Color 0052  Little Orphan Annie
Four color 0053  Wash Tubbs
Four Color 0054  Andy Panda 
Four Color 0055  Tillie the Toiler
Four Color 0056  Dick Tracy
Four color 0057  Gene Autry
Four color 0058  Smilin' Jack
Four Color 0059 Mother Goose
Four Color 0060 Tiny Folks Funnies
Four color 0061  Santa Claus Funnies
Four color 0062  Donald Duck in Frozen Gold
Four Color  0063 Roy Rogers
Four color 0064 Smokey Stover
Four color 0065 Smitty
Four Color 0066 Gene Autry
Four Color 0067 Oswald the Rabbit
Four color 0068 Mother Goose
Four color 0069  Fairy Tale Parade
Four Color 0070 Popeye
Four Color 0071 Three Caballeros
Four Color 0072 Raggedy Ann
Four Color 0073 The Gumps
Four Color 0074 Marge's Little Lulu
Four Color 0075-Gene Autry
Four color 0076 (Little Orphan Annie
Four Color 0077 Felix The Cat
Four Color 0078 Porky Pig
Four Color 0079 Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse
Four color 0080  Smilin' Jack
Four Color 0081 Moon Mullins
Four Color 0082 The Lone Ranger
Four color 0083  Gene Aurty
Four Color 0084 Flash Gordon
Four Color 0085 Andy Panda
Four Color 0086 Roy Rogers
Four Color 0087 Fairy Tale Parade
Four Color 0088 Bugs Bunny Great Adventure
Four Color 0089 Tillie The Toiler
Four Color 0090  Christmas with Mother Goose
Four color 0091 Santa Claus
Four Color 0092 Pinocchio
Four Color 0093 Gene Autry
Four color 0094  Winnie Winkle
Four Color 0095-Roy Rogers
Four Color 0096 Dick Tracy
Four color 0097  Little Lulu
Four color 0098  Lone Range
Four Color 0099 Smitty
Four color 0100 Gene Autry


 

 

LINKS: Four Color #0051-#0100 ⇲⇲

Wednesday, 9 January 2019

T-Man #01-#38 (1951-54) Quality Comics - Complete Series


 1951 Series
Published in English (United States)  United States

Number of Issues Published:
38 (#1 - #38)
Color:   color
Dimensions:   standard Golden Age US
Paper Stock:   glossy cover; newsprint interior
Binding:   saddle-stitched
Publishing Format:    was ongoing series

 Pages 36         Indicia frequency Bi-Monthly



Authors: 

Script
Joe Millard, Reed Crandall
Jack Cole, Joe Millard

Pencils
Edmond Good, Dan Zolnerowich,
Reed Crandall ?, Harry Anderson,
Jack Cole, Charles Sultan ?,  Reed Crandall

Inks
Joe Certa ?, Dan Zolnerowich, Charles Sultan ?,
Reed Crandall ?, Harry Anderson,
Jack Cole, Reed Crandall

Colors
?
Letters
Jack Cole



T-Man was first published in September 1951, by Quality Comics, the run continued until the company folded in 1956.

It has the claim to fame of probably being the only comic book ever that featured a U.S. Treasury agent as its hero. T-Man was also a classic anti-communist title.

In the 1920s and 1930s, FBI agents were colloquially referred to as 'G-Man', being a shortened version of 'Government man'. Soon 'T-Man' became used for a Treasury Department official.

T-Man's name was Pete Trask and he also appeared on the back pages of Police Comics. The T-Man title ran for 38 issues until Quality Comics went out of business. When DC Comics acquired the rights to Quality's characters Pete Trask as T-Man was one of the titles they decided to discontinue.

Texte: http://furycomics.com





Links: T-Man #01-#38⇲⇲
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...